Osman Karimu

Bachelor of Science Degree in Food Technology

Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources

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“I chose to study Food Technology because I eventually would like to run my own food processing plants in rural areas of Malawi, to create opportunities for development.

 

The name Rare Charity means a family to me…

I lost my father when I was a young child, so I was raised by my grandparents and then my uncle. Before he died, he left a word to his wife: “Take care of Osman and support him academically with the resources that you will have”. Knowing that I was related to the uncle who was then dead I thought my aunt could be cruel but that was not the case: she was kind and caring.

It was like I added paraffin oil on fire in terms of her love when I was selected to a national secondary school called St. Patrick’s. She celebrated my success but still I had no full confidence of proceeding with my school. This was so because my uncle was dead and my aunt was not working. The fees were truly high compared to the money our family relied on, which made some people suggest that I should not be allowed to go to that school. But that lady (my aunt) insisted on sending me to St. Patrick’s. She said that Osman should go to where he has been selected to go. She told them that she was preparing to pay the fees in halves and she was believing God to provide the family with other necessities. Many days I went without eating Nsima, our staple food, so that she could pay for house rent and for my fees.  She managed to pay fees in complete for two years of my studies at St. Patrick’s secondary school. I finished school and scored good grades which others did not expect. I saw God in the whole journey of my secondary school.

When I was accepted to LUANR, my family and I saw no way of finding the fees.  I felt hopeless.  But thanks to first the kindness of Mr. Alexander Kay, the manager of Satemwa Tea Estate, and then Rare Scholarships, I was able to start my bachelor’s education. I am now in my final semester of my course. My aunt has passed away now, but I believe that she would be very proud of me.

The name ‘Rare Charity’ means a family to me. This is so because to me a family is a group of people who share their experiences, problems and interests, and celebrate success together. I started having a complete sense of being in a family when I received first support of fully inclusive fees to attend LUANR, and it was increased when Madam Henrietta visited us here in Malawi.  It is thanks to Rare Charity that I can complete my studies at university.

I have seen a lot of changes for better academically and even my welfare as a student with the coming of Rare Charity to be my sponsors. Some of these changes include being able to report to school on time, which means I can start learning from the very first course until the last one now.  Thanks to Rare Charity, I am also staying within the school premises and I am taking enough meals now, which means no more starvation. In this case I expect to see progress in my studies.

I am very grateful to everyone who is contributing to Rare Charity pocket. I pray for you people to continue prospering and staying blessed there so that you may continue helping us and some other more students.